How to Become a Savvy Bodyguard

BodyguardsAs a bodyguard you will continue to reap the benefits of your career by working hard to achieve your career goals. However, don’t ever rest on your laurels. Here is a list of savvy bodyguard characteristics that you should develop.

Team Management: Regardless of the size of your bodyguard team, savvy bodyguards should keep their team members motivated and working effectively. To do this you must have the ability to inspire, influence and develop others on the team. If you are the detail leader you should hold goal-setting and evaluation sessions at the end of each shift to discuss specific issues and performance evaluations. These meetings should be geared towards improved performance, building morale, reiterating expectations and encouraging teamwork.

Attention to Detail: If it is worth doing, it’s worth doing thoroughly. Attention to detail is the mark of a savvy bodyguard.

Delegate Bodyguard: Tasks As a savvy bodyguard you should understand that delegation is important because gives you a capacity to handle greater responsibility, empower and motivate the bodyguards who work for you.

Positive Relationships: Savvy bodyguards should develop positive relationships in all areas of the assignment, sharing need-to-know information with others on the team and connecting-well with others for mission success.

First to Wake Up & Last to Sleep: As a savvy bodyguard you should be the first one up every morning and the last one to bed on assignment. This will keep you in the know and well-informed on specific situations, circumstances and events; you will gain more knowledge and increase your intelligence.  Savvy bodyguards should be always increasing their insight for sound judgment and improved protection for the principal and the team.

Procedural Knowledge: The savvy bodyguard must have a high degree of procedural knowledge and bodyguard skills. Procedural knowledge and skills reflect the degree to which you are able to accomplish bodyguard tasks on assignment. Performance is achieved when knowing what to do is combined with knowing how to do it; this makes you a savvy bodyguard. The best savvy bodyguards have proven to be students of the profession. Keep learning and studying the game for operational excellence.  Keep safe and God speed.

About Doc Rogers: He is the author of best seller Corporate Executive Protection – A Manual for Inspiring Corporate Bodyguards and the newly released eBook entitled How to Build Your Own Executive Protection Business.  Doc is president and CEO of International Corporate Executive Protection Ltd., has earned a Ph.D. in Security Administration from Southwest University, is a Certified Protection Specialist from Executive Security International, a decorated former veteran police officer and is SE Asia’s leading expert on executive protection and corporate security.

Am I too old to be a bodyguard?

Old BodyguardQuestion of the week: An individual recently asked me at 52 was he too old  for Bodyguard work? Here was my response.

Too old is a relative concept. Too old for what? It’s all about the individual and the condition he’s in. I’m 50 and fat thanks to the poor choices I like to blame on my environment. Am I too old for protection work ? – NO. Am I too fat? -YES. I don’t think a fit guy can be too old for protection work as long as all his body parts are working and he’s maintained the edge over the years. Me … well I better step away from the refrigerator really soon.

Research and preparation aimed at identifying potential threats and contingency plans supersedes age. Overall, what’s expected is everything it takes to make the life of your client safer. Anticipating needs is a big one— being able to look at a situation and determine what can go wrong and make sure it doesn’t; or knowing how to fix a problem once it occurs.

 Have a great weekend

 Hucky

How to Choose the Right Bodyguard Assignment

BodyguardsIt’s your responsibility to educate yourself on choosing the right bodyguard assignment that is right for you. You need to have the ability to say “no” and not go after particular bodyguard assignments that aren’t rights for you and your bodyguard future. You should keep the following in mind:

 The Client Profile

Look for the right assignment with the right client for your skill set and relative to your bodyguard career goals. For example, you wouldn’t want to go on a bodyguard assignment with a principal who is a heavy metal rock artist known for numerous brushes with the law and illegal drug use if your ultimate goal is getting into executive security; bodyguarding CEOs of multi-national corporations. It’s just not a good fit for your career ambitions with too many negatives involved. You don’t want to risk your future career reputation bodyguarding sleazy clients, give it a pass, you don’t have time for games, keep focused on your mission.

The Team Profile

The majority of the bodyguard assignments you will go will have team members who are principled, loyal, dignified and professional. However, there still are a few bodyguard teams in the business that have members without honor, respect, personal commitment or discipline. You do not want to be on such a team such. Instead look for teams who value trust, respect, solidity, professionalism and loyalty. Avoid ‘cowboy teams’ with no honor code or mutual respect at all costs. You’ll be glad you did.

 Your Position on the Team

Look for the right assignment with the right position for your skill set and relative to your bodyguard career goals. For instances, if you are just starting out in the bodyguard industry you should ask yourself do I have the required skills at this stage of my career?  For example, the principal wants you to conduct a three country advance to include: 1) Entry/Exit airport surveys, 2) Responsible hospital surveys, 3) Hotel surveys, 4) Safe heaven surveys, 5) Venue surveys and, 6) Route surveys. You should not bother applying if you don’t have the required skills to conduct these assignments in a professional manner.  Remember, the skill level required to be hired depends on the job and expectations.

However, as a rule advance work is a craft that needs to be studied, practiced and mastered. To succeed as an advance man in the bodyguard business you must have the ability to do the job well and the potential to do the job great. Keep studying your craft, build your confidence and keep focused. You don’t get paid good money for something that does not require training and expertise. This is not to discourage you, just trust your abilities and make sure you are ready and fully prepared for the particular assignment. When you are ready, you’ll know it and will accept the position with complete confidence in your ability.

What Teams Look for in Prospective Bodyguards?

Teams on the circuit look for prospective team members who are professional and pleasant, someone who has a good understanding of the business and fits in with the other members on the team. This also means knowledge of the principal and the culture of the company. They will also look for industry experience and training, someone with good people skills, widely trusted, keeps confidences, doesn’t blame others for his own errors and keeps clear moral and ethical boundaries when bodyguarding principals. Get trained in the specific skills and knowledge you may be lacking, be persistent, proactive and sets high standards for yourself and your bodyguard career. Some things new bodyguards need to work on is paying attention to details, being open to criticism and applying good listening skills at all times. It is strongly recommended to work on any of these skills you may be deficient in every day. Bodyguard candidates usually score higher on interviews with teams on the circuit when they have these characteristics. Good luck and God speed.

About Doc Rogers: He is the author of best seller Corporate Executive Protection – A Manual for Inspiring Corporate Bodyguards and the newly released eBook entitled How to Build Your Own Executive Protection Business.  Doc is president and CEO of International Corporate Executive Protection Ltd., has earned a Ph.D. in Security Administration from Southwest University, is a Certified Protection Specialist from Executive Security International, a decorated former veteran police officer and is SE Asia’s leading expert on executive protection and corporate security.

How to Apply for a Bodyguard Job

Bodyguard header 1How to Apply for a Bodyguard Job

By Doc Rogers

The following are successful strategies and techniques for making a positive impression when applying for a bodyguard job and during the interview.

Get Prepared

Find out as much as possible about the corporation or the affluent person that is in need of bodyguard service. This should be done through researching newspapers, magazines and websites. Your preparation will tell prospective employers that you are interested, thorough and prepared for the job.  Once you have done your research and have found a select group of corporations or the affluent people that may be interested in your bodyguard services mail them your cover letter and résumé. This is called targeted mailing. Prior to receiving a call for an interview get prepared as much as possible.

Dress Code

Your dress code should be that of a professional, this means formal business attire; a sharp dressed professional in every sense of the word.

During the Interview

No one likes to see mean looking bodyguards with scowls on their faces, so remember to smile to make a good first impression and influence the hiring decision. Also maintain eye contact with your interviewer and provide eager responses when applicable. Show the interviewer that you are a go-getter, one that has education, intellect and ability.  To accomplish this during the interview not only should you answer key questions with confidence, you should be ready to ask a few key questions as well.  Ask two or three questions about security issues you have researched.  This will demonstrate your knowledge and intelligence about the employer and don’t forget to write-down the interviewer’s answers in your notebook. Never talk negatively about former employers, your goal is to maintain a positive attitude to show the interviewer that you have the ability to get along and you’re a team player.

Goal of the First Interview

Usually during the first interview you will not be given a job offer. Therefore, your goal at the first interview is not to get a bodyguard job offer, but to get called back for a second interview. At the end of the first interview ask the interviewer for the next steps. Do not take “We’ll call you know.” Show your enthusiasm, let interviewer know that you are interested in the position, and always inquire about the next steps in the process so you may professionally follow-up.  After each interview send thank-you card as soon as possible. Mention each person with whom you met during the interviews. Be sure your thank-you card is professional. Send the thank-you card via e-mail or overnight courier.

Use Your Resources

Use any contacts or references that may impact the hiring decision in your favor. This could be someone who actually knows the employer or the interviewer.  It never hurts to ask your contacts or references put in a good word for you after the first interview.

Recommendations for Applying in Person

Recommendations for applying in person: 1) Always be on time for any appointment (10-15 minutes early), 2) Be polite and humble, 3) Remove your sunglasses, 4) Bring your résumé, 5) Print neatly within the lines on the application, 6) Dress appropriately and look your absolute best and, 7) Run your job applications and the interview process like a business. Don’t make any negative comments, leave your ego at the door and you’ll become a success. Good luck and God speed.

About Doc Rogers: He is the author of best seller Corporate Executive Protection – A Manual for Inspiring Corporate Bodyguards and the newly released eBook entitled How to Build Your Own Executive Protection Business.  Doc is president and CEO of International Corporate Executive Protection Ltd., has earned a Ph.D. in Security Administration from Southwest University, is a Certified Protection Specialist from Executive Security International, a decorated former veteran police officer and is SE Asia’s leading expert on executive protection and corporate security.

 

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How To Break Into The Executive Protection Industry

Executive ProtectionExecutive Protection

INTRODUCTION

Breaking in the executive protection industry can be difficult and challenging. Fresh graduates from executive protection academies believe all they need is an executive protection diploma to become successful in the industry. Landing contracts and obtaining work in the executive protection business is a skill. This article is going to show you the techniques you need to land contracts and get hired in the executive protection trade.

REALITIES OF THE TRADE

Selecting a career in the executive protection industry is exciting. However, fresh out of the academy rookies have the perception that the job provides glamour, recognition and fortune and bodyguards live an electrifying, fashionable and jet set lifestyles. In reality the industry involves a lot of hard work, dedication, time-critical decisions and long hours. Rest assured there is plenty of work in this industry if you have the determination, commitment and are prepared to put in the focused efforts required.

HOW THE INDUSTRY WORKS

In order to succeed in the industry you need to know how it functions and how and where to find executive protection contracts and employment opportunities. The majority of executive protection contracts are short assignments of one to two weeks duration. Permanent executive protection positions are difficult to obtain, but not impossible. This is because executive protection personnel who have permanent positions don’t give them up easily. Most of the contracts within the industry are based on being a vendor or sub-contractor for executive protection firms as well as corporate executive protection units (EPUs). Although the executive protection industry is global in nature, it’s still relatively small. Networking, word of mouth, reputation and credibility are heavily relied upon to get assignments. To get onboard as a vendor with executive protection companies and corporate EPUs you must fit the profile of a professionally trained, discreet, team player.

WHAT TO EXPECT

You have to be well-organized and pay attention to detail. As a bodyguard you must be able to give orders and follow orders, work long and irregular hours without complaining and be able to provide top-notch, internationally accepted bodyguard techniques. This means performing your protective duties discreetly, adroitly and with complete assurance.

POSITIONS MAY VARY

On some assignments your position on the team may vary. One week you may be on the close protection team, the next week you may be on the principal’s baggage security team riding in fright elevators and in luggage deliver trucks. After that you may be assigned on the halls and walls detail guarding a hotel suite while the principal sleeps. Remember you are being tested on all aspects of the bodyguard trade when you first begin. Do not complain about any position. Gladly accept all positions and learn every facet of the job, because your professional behavior is also being tested at this stage of your career.

BE WILLING TO WORK YOUR WAY UP

The most popular way of entering the executive protection industry is by starting out as a halls and walls agent and to advance from there. If you take the halls and walls position seriously and act professional you may find yourself on the close protection team guarding the principal sooner than you expected. However, close protection positions are attainable typically on the basis of executive protection experience, training and qualifications. This is why you must be continuously developing your executive protection skill levels. Training is your fast track up the executive protection ladder and will propel you to where you want to be. You need to take a long-term interest in your executive protection career development. Keep Safe & God Speed.

Doc Rogers

 

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